TokenMail is now available on Nuget!

Standard

Back in January this year, I wrote a neat little utility library for sending template emails. Tonight, it caught the attention of fellow developer Benjamin Howarth, famous for (among other things) his Umbraco mastery.

After a quick discussion, Ben decided to join me in maintaining the library and christened his membership in the project by adding a new ‘load from URL’ feature. And, a short while later, a package was available on Nuget. Not bad for around an hour’s work I thought!

To download and install the package easily via Nuget, bring up the Package Manager window within Visual Studio and type:

I created the initial version of the library with simplicity in mind: it’s not fancy, or complex. It was designed purely to provide a solution to developers who have to send templated emails in their projects.

Perhaps my favourite ‘feature’ of this library though isn’t really a feature at all, so much as it is actually a by-product of the way it has been designed: because it picks up template files from disk (or from a remote URL), you can easily allow your end-users to modify their own templates using your favourite rich-text editor. Pretty neat.

Please feed back!

I think it would be cool if we could get a little community of users together who could help drive the project forward with further suggestions. Head on over to the project hub at Codeplex to get involved, or download the latest version. And, if you decide to use the library, please, please, please – do rate it on Codeplex and/or drop me a note to let me know how you’re using it. It’s not a requirement, of course, but since we do this stuff for free in our spare time, we love to read feedback.

Thanks!

Open-source FTP-to-Azure blob storage: multiple users, one blob storage account

Standard

A little while ago, I came across an excellent article by Maarten Balliauw in which he described a project he was working on to support FTP directly to Azure’s blob storage. I discovered it while doing some research on a similar concept I was working on. At the time of writing this post though, Maarten wasn’t  sharing his source code and even if he did decide to at some point soon, his project appears to focus on permitting access to the entire blob storage account. This wasn’t really what I was looking for but it was very similar…

My goal: FTP to Azure blobs, many users: one blob storage account with ‘home directories’

I wanted a solution to enable multiple users to access the same storage account, but to have their own unique portion of it – thereby mimicking an actual FTP server. A bit like giving authenticated user’s their own ‘home folder’ on your Azure Blob storage account.

This would ultimately give your Azure application the ability to accept incoming FTP connections and store files directly into blob storage via any popular FTP client – mimicking a file and folder structure and permitting access only to regions of the blob storage account you determine. There are many potential uses for this kind of implementation, especially when you consider that blob storage can feed into the Microsoft CDN…

Features

  • Deploy within a worker-role
  • Support for most common FTP commands
  • Custom authentication API: because you determine the authentication and authorisation APIs, you control who has access to what, quickly and easily
  • Written in C#

How it works

In my implementation, I wanted the ability to literally ‘fake’ a proper FTP server to any popular FTP client: the server component to be running on Windows Azure. I wanted to have some external web service do my authentication (you could host yours on Windows Azure, too) and then only allow each user access to their own tiny portion of my Azure Blob Storage account.

It turns out, Azure’s containers did exactly what I wanted, more or less. All I had to do was to come up with a way of authenticating clients via FTP and returning which container they have access to (the easy bit), and write an FTP to Azure ‘bridge’ (adapting and extending a project by Mohammed Habeeb to run in Azure as a worker role).

Here’s how my first implementation works:

A quick note on authentication

When an FTP client authenticates, I grab the username and password sent by the client, pass that into my web service for authentication, and if successful, I return a container name specific to that customer. In this way, the remote user can only work with blobs within that container. In essence, it is their own ‘home directory’ on my master Azure Blob Storage account.

The FTP server code will deny authentication for any user who does not have a container name associated with them, so just return null to the login procedure if you’re not going to give them access (I’m assuming you don’t want to return a different error code for ‘bad password’ vs. ‘bad username’ – which is a good thing).

Your authentication API could easily be adapted to permit access to the same container by multiple users, too.

Simulating a regular file system from blob storage

Azure Blob Storage doesn’t work like a traditional disk-based system in that it doesn’t actually have a hierarchical directory structure – but the FTP service simulates one so that FTP clients can work in the traditional way. Mohammed’s initial C# FTP server code was superb: he wrote it so that the file system could be replaced back in 2007 – to my knowledge, before Azure existed, but it’s like he meant for it to be used this way (that is to say, it was so painless to adapt it one could be forgiven for thinking this. Mohammed, thanks!).

Now I have my FTP server, modified and adapted to work for Azure, there are many ways in which this project can be expanded…

Over to you (and the rest of the open source community)

It’s my first open source project and I actively encourage you to help me improve it. When I started out, most of this was ‘proof of concept’ for a similar idea I was working on. As I look back over the past few weekends of work, there are many things I’d change but I figured there’s enough here to make a start.

If you decide to use it “as is” (something I don’t advise at this stage), do remember that it’s not going to be perfect and you’ll need to do a little leg work – it’s a work in progress and it wasn’t written (at least initially) to be an open-source project. Drop me a note to let me know how you’re using it though, it’s always fun to see where these things end up once you’ve released them into the wild.

Where to get it

Head on over to the FTP to Azure Blob Storage Bridge project on CodePlex.

It’s free for you to use however you want. It carries all the usual caveats and warnings as other ‘free open-source’ software: use it at your own risk.

If you do use it and it works well for you, drop me an email and it’ll make me happy. 🙂